How To Maintain Your Company Culture While Hiring

Workplace culture is much more important than you think. Often, top candidates (especially younger ones) spur higher paying positions to work in an environment that “feels like home”. It’s critical that you sell your culture when courting job candidates.

"Your brand is your culture."

Corporate culture comes from the top. It should be the ongoing contribution of the founders and/or the C-suite. However, times goes by. Founders leave or become disinterested. The C-suite has enough on their plate. Your company culture can end up in the utility closet next to the broken printer and reams of matte printer paper.

We’re not going to tell you how to create a strong corporate culture. Maybe in another blog post, but not this one. We’ll assume that you’ve put in the work to create a unique, dynamic culture that sets you apart.

This article will tell you how to protect and maintain your corporate culture while hiring and ensure new hires are a cultural fit.

Be open

When discussing your corporate culture with a candidate, you need to be transparent and upfront. It’s something to be proud of, not something to brush under the rug.

If you are interviewing an outgoing candidate and are concerned about his or her fit in your button-downed, reserved organization, you owe it to yourself, your organization, and the candidate to address you concerns.  Maybe the candidate is just chatty out of nervousness. Address it and save everyone a lot of problems down the road.

Set clear expectations

Take the time to some things down in writing. You don’t want to end of playing a game of telephone with something as important as your corporate culture. Be clear about what behaviors and principles your business values. Don’t leave the candidate guessing.

Do as you say

This one is easy and is you don’t do it, you’re done for. You can’t sell your culture or effectively share it with a candidate if you don’t believe in it yourself. Walk the walk, don’t just talk the talk. Many things that appear on formalized job documents don’t translate at all to daily job performance. Make it clear that your company culture can be seen every day.

Recruit the right people

Drill HR or your recruiting team on your culture. Let them know how they can leverage it to get the attention of top candidates, but more importantly make sure that they are finding candidates whose values are consistent with it. You can identify candidates who would be good cultural fits by spending time learning about their motivation, past behavior, and they type of culture they are seeking in their next role.

Hire leaders who buy in

Leaders need to be the defenders of your corporate culture. They need to be on the same page and ready to buy in before they start. Extra time spent vetting, testing, and interviewing leadership candidates will pay dividends down the road.

Keep it personal

Develop relationships with your team. It’s much easier to share values, motivations, and goals with people when you know them well. The more your know about you employees the better you can relate to them.

Re-inforce the community

Culture, like all things in the business world, won’t take care of itself. It’s a living, breathing, growing thing and you need to care for it. A golf outing, family picnic, or leadership retreat can go a long way in strengthening your culture and your team. Make the investment, it’s not optional.

What’s your corporate culture? How do you maintain it when making new hires?