How to Ask for a Raise

In today’s workplace, if you want a raise, you’ve got to ask for one. However, if you’re like most people, you’ve probably never asked for a raise. The first thing you need to know is that it’s perfectly normal to ask. Here is a guide that will help you get the salary you deserve.

 

When to Ask

Like with most things in life and in business, timing is critical. You don’t want to catch your boss on a particularly busy or stressful day. On the other hand, if you’ve just closed a big deal or saved the day for a major client, it could be time to capitalize on those accomplishments. A good rule is to wait for the one-year mark of when you were hired or last promoted.

 

Build Your Case

Once you’ve decided that now is the right time to ask for a raise, it’s not enough to be prepared to simply ask, you must be prepared to persuade. Outline your accomplishments over the year, point out the ways you’ve gone above your job description, and highlight the projects you want to take on in the future that also go beyond your official duties. Here, numbers mean more than anything else. If you’ve made quantifiable impacts for your company, be sure to cite those specific numbers.

 

Know Your Number 

Don’t just ask for a raise in general. Be specific about the increase you’d like (either in dollars or a percentage). Do your research and know what the market rate is for your skill set.

 

Don’t Make it Personal

You might need more money for any number of reasons. However, your boss doesn’t need to know and likely won’t care. Expect any raise to be given out based on merit and your impact on the company, not life circumstances. Keeping the conversation business-focused will only help your chances. 

 

What to Say

Your request should be fairly brief. Focus on why you think you’ve earned a raise. Most of the time, something like this is sufficient:

“I really appreciate the opportunities you’ve given me to take on greater responsibilities. I’ve been getting great results in those areas over the last year and have exceeded the goals we created. Could we talk about adjusting my salary to reflect this higher level of contribution?”

 

“No” or “Maybe”

If you get a “No”, follow up with questions about what additional responsibilities or improved performance your manager feels would warrant a pay increase. If you get a “Maybe”, make sure you’re clear on what the next steps are. Whether the plan is to pitch your proposal to HR or reconvene to discuss things in more detail, find out what else can you do to further make your case.

 

Don’t give an ultimatum

You should be confident and assertive in making your request for a raise. However, you don’t want to come across as too demanding. The last thing you want to do is give your manager an ultimatum. Unless, of course, you are willing to follow through with it.

It’s totally normal to ask for a raise. You need to know when to ask and how to build a compelling case for yourself. Know what number you want to get to and don’t bring your personal situation into the discussion. Prepare what you are going to say in advance and how you’ll respond to an answer other than “Yes”. 

Best of luck! Now go out there and get what you deserve.

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