How to Extend a Job Offer

The most crucial stage of the interview process is the extending of the job offer. The employer has invested hours interviewing and vetting their candidate. They’ve finally decided on the candidate that they want to join their team. They are putting all of their hopes into this one candidate and this one offer. To succeed with your job offer you must first nail down any remaining details and present the offer in the right way.

Pay

Some employers will touch on compensation prior to the offer stage, others won’t. It’s best practice to touch on this topic during the second interview and get an idea of what your candidate’s desired compensation range is. You need to make an offer that’s in your candidate’s compensation range. Otherwise, you’ll just waste your time and theirs.

The offer letter needs to include the following:

  • Total compensation
  • How that compensation will be paid (salary or hourly)
  • Bonus structure (if applicable)
  • Commission structure (if applicable)
  • Payment schedule

Benefits

You likely haven’t touched on your benefits package much in previous interviews, so you’ll need to explain them in the offer letter.

Plan to include the following:

  • Details on health insurance (dental and vision)
  • Enrollment period
  • 401k or retirement account (matching)

Details

The offer letter is a very important document because it lays out the working arrangement between company and employee. Be sure that what you have in the offer letter reflects your conversations during the interview process or you may end up with a surprised or unhappy candidate.

Cover yourself and your business by spelling out the following:

  • Start date
  • Working hours
  • Personal and sick day policy

Process

In many cases, how you extend a job offer matters more than what is actually in the job offer. Follow this process and you’ll give yourself the best possible chance of getting your offer accepted quickly.

  • Include all of the above elements into your offer letter
  • Write it as a selling document for both the job opportunity and your company
  • Schedule a phone conversation with your candidate and let them know that you’ll be sending the job offer over shortly before the scheduled call
  • Send the offer letter to the candidate just a few minutes prior to your call
  • Read and review the offer letter over the phone with your candidate
  • Let them know how excited you are to have them on your team
  • Ask them for their acceptance
  • If you don’t get it, ask what questions they have, work them out over the phone, and close the candidate

No matter what you choose to do, no matter how you decide to extend the offer, make sure that you are as detailed as possible and that you are selling the opportunity as hard as you can every step of the way. Happy hiring!

 

Toxicity in the Workplace

Today, many employees are stuck in a toxic workplace. These bad vibes can cause people to dislike their jobs, kill productivity, and hamper the growth of your organization. Having a toxic workplace or bad office culture can turn a profit-generating business into a money pit. So, what is a toxic environment and how do we stop it? To understand, we first need to know how a toxic workplace is created so that you can effectively change it and make your organization a great place to work.

Communication

If you are starting to see a decline in communication or you find it difficult to communicate with your team effectively you may have a problem. One of the most well-known signs of toxicity in the work environment is the lack of effective communication. This can have a tremendously negative impact on the production of your business. Communication and teamwork are vital to any business that wants to be successful. Without communication, you will see a rapid decline in individual and team functions. Workers who are subject to a toxic work environment will often say they don’t feel heard or understood by their peers or leaders.

Work Habits

Toxicity in the workplace can take a great employee from thriving to barely surviving. An employee will thrive when they feel valued and appreciated. When they feel underpaid and underappreciated it puts them into a fight or flight mode of survival. Our natural instincts kick in and our defensive walls go up. You will see an increase in absences, poor attitude, and lack of individual production because they are working to get to the end of the day rather than t to achieve a shared goal.

Team Work

Broken relationships and friendships can wreak havoc in the work environment. Gossiping becomes the norm, cliques are formed, and people feel pitted against one another. Most workers relate these types of experiences to that of being in high school. It is important to work together and have trust in your peers. Team building exercises can help strengthen the bonds of trust between team members and build rapport around the office.  These exercises don’t have to be elaborate or have huge prizes. They are fun and provide a productive break from your ordinary schedule.

Work/Life Balance

As an employee, it is imperative to have a good balance of work and home life. Without it you will feel the negative effects it can have on your daily performance and your overall health. These negative effects can go both ways. If you are thriving at work and happy at home life can be so rewarding. If the scale is tipped slightly one way or another it can be very challenging to get back into harmony. These types of imbalances are likely to have a negative effect not only on you but your coworkers, as well. Both employee and manager are responsible for creating a workable work/life balance within your company.

The Spread

Many people know that toxicity can be like a spore of dandelion fluff in the wind once it is blown apart it spreads quickly. As a leader, it is important to snuff out any turmoil or issues before the trouble threatens morale within the office. It’s critical to the success of your business that you remain vigilant to any changes in the attitude of your team.

All in all, toxicity in the workplace is something that can occur within any organization, however, with the right environment and the right management your organization can thrive within a strong, happy office. The bottom line is, if management can quickly identify and stop it in its tracks, you will have an organization full of happy employees, willing to work hard for you day in and day out. Best of luck!